Reduce, Reuse, Recycle OR not…

Trash on the seashore

Living on the island of Magerøya, where the Barents Sea and the Norwegian Sea meet, I find constant reminders of the impact humans have on this planet, as well as my personal responsibility to be a better caretaker of the world I live in.

This summer, when my family hiked to this cove, my 5-year old daughter said, “This is a sad place, Mommy.”   And although this is one of my favorite places to hike to, I couldn’t have agreed more as I looked at the driftwood riddled with water bottles, ketchup and mustard bottles, plastic crates, jugs, buoys, a computer, a stove and countless other debris.

So the question is, what am I, or we, going to do about it?  As a family, we can carry out some trash each time we hike there.  If each hiker did the same thing, that would be a start.  And next summer we need to organize a volunteer day to pick up trash, and a boat to haul it away.  Any other suggestions?  Because one thing is for certain – it’s not going to magically disappear.

trash, trash and more trash

About ekhaugli

I'm Erica from America living at the top of the world - North Cape, Norway. I run my own gallery, Once Upon a Dream Gallery and Gift Shop, nestled in the picturesque fishing town, Honningsvåg. In 2014 I started and environmental art project, One Step at a Time, concentrating on removing trash from or arctic shoreline.
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3 Responses to Reduce, Reuse, Recycle OR not…

  1. The trash is terribly sad, but they do make interesting photo’s. I watched an amazing documentary on how poop people make money by recycling in India. If we could transform “first world” people, that they could start to think of trash in a different way – as something to be harnessed and reused, I think we could really make a difference. One of the projects I am involved in, is using old two litre coke bottles and piping to create solar water heating. We have a couple of projects using 2L coke bottles actually to make lights, vertical gardens etc. These are all used in rural areas where people are really impoverished, and have no access to electricity etc. To these people, what we consider trash, could transform their lives!

    • ekhaugli says:

      Thanks for your comment, Sarah. After I wrote this post I found a link to a project in the Philippines like the one you are involved with (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-pacific-14967535). It’s fascinating and inspiring. I’ll check out your website as well. I’ve been doing some research about the Great Garbage Patch, a trash vortex larger than the state of Texas, as well. That definitely makes me ask myself how I can make a difference.

  2. http://www.letuswork.wordpress.com – is where you can find some info on what we are trying to do

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